Smart Grid - Green Hydrogen

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Written by Pierluigi Mancarella

In the context of decarbonizing power and energy systems worldwide, what is the role of green hydrogen that is generated from renewable energy sources through electrolyzers? Is it an unrealizable chimera, a possible but far reality, a game-change opportunity, or the panacea to all our decarbonization issues? In this article, we discuss the different approaches that are being explored in the UK and Australia – two of the countries that are leading the discussions on hydrogen – along with relevant differences, similarities, challenges, and opportunities.

Written by Sivapriya Bhagavathy and Jagruti Thakur

Hydrogen has been in use for many decades in sectors like refining and chemical industries. However, its use as an energy source has started receiving increased interest only in recent years. As this interest and end-use grow, the demand for hydrogen will also grow with an expected compound annual growth rate of 5.48% from 2019 to 2025 [1].

Written by Vishalya Sooriarachchi

Green hydrogen, a major part of the transformation towards 100% renewable energy, is considered an important source of energy. It currently is of considerable cost as of now, and only comprises a minimal amount of energy percentage in the U.S. energy market. However, there is higher interest in determining the level of significance green hydrogen is capable to play in the development of the transportation industry considering a revolutionary development is needed in the sector. The usage of Green Hydrogen in the transportation sector has created a novel requirement to initiate the development of cost-efficient extraction methods and the share of renewable sources rendered for the production of Hydrogen is expected to increase in order to comply with a considerable percentage of energy demand in the transportation sector.

Written by Doug Houseman

In 2020 California curtailed more than 1.3 Tera-watthours (TWH)1 up from 1 TWH in 20192. Curtailment is rising faster than installation of new renewables and will continue to grow until storage catches up with renewable production.


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IEEE Smart Grid Newsletter Compendium

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