Presented by:
Subhonmesh Bose, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Scalability is the fundamental challenge in the design of algorithms for monitoring, controlling, and optimizing the assets of a power system. Adoption of distributed energy resources (DERs) is adding to the number of controllable devices. Integration of variable renewable production from wind and solar is making it necessary to account for multiple different scenarios in making dispatch decisions with uncertain supply. Addition of phasor measurement units and automated metering infrastructure is leading to the collection of a large amount of data that needs processing to provide meaningful information. Thus, system operations today require algorithms that are able to synthesize large volumes of data, produce actionable decisions within reasonable runtimes, and do so with provable performance guarantees. In this talk, an overview of the design challenges in solving large-scale optimization problems in power system operation will be presented, how these problems are compounded by the evolving landscape of the power grid, and various approaches to address them.  

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Presented by: Charlie Vartanian and Chris Searles

Thursday, January 11, 2018 | 1:00 – 2:00pm ET
Energy Storage (ES) has been present on the grid for decades, for example the 20,000MW of pumped storage operating in the U.S. However, technology advances in both batteries and inverters have expanded functionality and lowered costs to the point that battery-based ES systems are now being actively deployed for a much wider range of applications, including renewables integration and microgrid implementation. This webinar will outline how ES reached this point of growing adoption, and highlight topics critical for continued ES adoption and effective integration, including, technical standards, safety codes, and useful collaboration across industry segments.

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Presented by: Marc Peters, IBM Distinguished Engineer and CTO for E&U Europe, IBM; Jos Roling, Senior Architect for Global Center of Competency Energy & Utilities, IBM

Thursday, July 27, 2017 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm ET

Blockchain for E&U - is it hype or reality?

Blockchain is a new pattern in IT that dramatically changes the support of transactions between market participants that form an eco-system or business network. This particularly of importance for the energy & utility industry that is undergoing major transformation. This transformation leads to more frequent transactions and additional challenges linked to growth of distributed energy resources and number of market participants.

This talk demystifies the applications of blockchain in the energy eco system. After a brief explanation of blockchain we discuss how innovative energy parties address this new opportunity.

  • The types of use cases of applying blockchain
  • The decision model to start a blockchain project
  • The taxonomy of a blockchain project

Finally, we briefly discuss some of the blockchain projects both presenters have worked on.

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Thursday, July 13, 2017 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm ET

Utilities have been on a digitization journey for many years, but it’s now time for a transformational step change. Namely, an evolution to a decentralized, collaborative model over traditional, centralized command and control models—where edge, mobile and cloud solutions are used to redesign utility business processes and operational practices.

Distributed generation, renewables, smart grids, storage and prosumers are accelerating the rate of change as well as creating a new level of complexity to manage—traditional command and control operational models can only get utilities so far. It’s time to move away from the operational models of the past—it’s time for a paradigm shift to meet the new level of change and complexity required to manage the active grid. The active grid of today and tomorrow demands greater collaboration—from the control room out to the field and the grid edge—for utilities to successfully meet the challenges of grid modernization and digital transformation.

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Presented by: Luis (Nando) Ochoa, Professor, The University of Melbourne and The University of Manchester

Thursday, September 29, 2016 | 5:00 – 6:00pm EDT

With the proliferation of residential and utility scale renewable generation, the deployment of smart meters, and the future adoption of electric vehicles and storage technologies, there is no doubt that electricity distribution networks are at the heart of the Smart Grid revolution. This, however, will require the traditional distribution network operator (DNO) to evolve into an engaged, flexible distribution system operator (DSO) in which network elements and participants (consumers, generators, and those that do both) are actively managed to fulfill technical, economic, and environmental objectives. Key to this evolution is the provision of a forward-looking regulatory framework in which innovation must be encouraged.

This webinar will present and discuss the different mechanisms adopted in the last decade by the UK Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (Ofgem), arguably one of the most progressive regulatory authorities in the world, to support innovation among DNOs – including the recent £500 million Low Carbon Networks Fund. The DSO vision in the UK and abroad, potential future roles, and the perceived challenges to ensure the corresponding transition will also be presented and discussed.

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Presented by: Mangaya Sivagnanam, Vice-chair IEEE Smart Grid R & D Committee 

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Vehicle to Grid V2G is one of the pivotal technology that gives us ultimate control over energy and grid efficiency. The smart grid utilizes this technological advancement in developing a gridable vehicle ecosystem (battery electric vehicles (BEV), plug-in hybrids (PHEV), plug-in vehicle (PEV)) in its fullest operational possibilities. Leading to intertwined Smart Grid domains and operational networks with other Critical Infrastructures – Energy, Transportation, and Tele-communication. The presentation elaborates on the security and privacy challenges in the V2G network and its impact on grid resilience.

This talk focus on all primary components of Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) and Vehicle-to-Home (V2H) infrastructure, applications and its security and privacy challenges and highlights for secure deployment options on

  • Transmission and distribution, substation automation model
  • Customer’s premise area network enablement – demand response, charging stations, and smart metering systems
  • Commercial and residential charging stations’infrastructure aiding integrated transport payment systems, 4G/LTE connectivity, roaming, and billing
  • Customer and vehicle identify
  • Regulatory Commitments

Presented by Nelson Bacalao, Hugo Bashualdo and George Zhou - Siemens PTI

Thursday, May 26, 2016 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm ET


Renewable generation integration not only impacts operational and engineering processes, but also planning. Transmission and distribution systems were traditionally planned as separated activities . In fact, DG for instance was merely considered a substation load reduction only, which was appropriate for small levels of penetration but grossly inadequate with larger levels where there are reverse flows at times into transmission. The effective integration of transmission and distribution planning is critical not only to utility resource planning, but also to meeting core utility service reliability and transformational growth requirements.

In this webinar, IEEE Smart Grid Experts, Nelson Bacalao, Hugo Bashualdo, and George Zhou will cover lessons learned from over 145 GW of generation interconnection studies, where more than 50% of them were wind and solar PV. They will also discuss the role and challenges created by utility scale, distributed and renewable generation when addressing the impacts of retiring conventional generation due to environmental compliance and other reasons, as well as the impacts of DG to a distribution system.

In the distribution space, two critical questions need to be addressed in regards to DG: i) How much DG can a distribution feeder host without system improvement? ii) How much capital investment is needed to increase the feeder hosting capacity to a targeted DG penetration level, i.e. 100% of the feeder capacity?

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