Presented by: Steven E. Collier, Director, Smart Grid Strategies, Milsoft Utility Solutions

Part 2 : The Smart Grid Emerges

Carl Sagan said, “You have to know the past to understand the present”. Most everyone knows something about the emerging smart grid. However, not everyone knows the whole story about how and why the smart grid began. It is not only fascinating, but also useful to understand the underlying causes that led to the emergence and continuing development of a smart grid. It’s all about changing technologies and business models. In Part 2 of this webinar we will discuss how disruptive new technologies have emerged to produce, store, and manage energy, both on the supply side and the demand side, resulting in much more complexity in the operations of the electric grid. We will examine how information and communications technologies are enabling a smart grid which will ultimately become a cyber physical system.

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Presented by: Steven E. Collier, Director, Smart Grid Strategies, Milsoft Utility Solutions

Part 1 : Eroding the Foundations of the Legacy Electric Grid

Carl Sagan said, “You have to know the past to understand the present”. Most everyone knows something about the emerging smart grid. However, not everyone knows the whole story about how and why the smart grid began. It is not only fascinating, but also useful to understand the underlying causes that led to the emergence and continuing development of a smart grid. It’s all about changing technologies and business models. In Part 1 of this webinar we will examine why and how the foundations of the century old legacy electric grid have eroded, beginning in the 1970s in the aftermath of the OPEC oil embargo. Longstanding favorable economics, acceptable reliability, stable monopoly business model, and standard utility operations were adversely affected.

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Presented by: Alan M Ross, Vice President of Reliability, SD Myers



The application of Reliability Engineering disciplines and principles provides a unique perspective to a Smart Grid. In this webinar we will look at how technology, UIoT, Machine Learning and Condition Based Monitoring can positively affect the long-term reliability of the Grid. While reliability engineering starts at the design phase for asset management decisions, an even greater impact will be on the system those assets comprise. For the most part we are redesigning systems, not designing from scratch, adding technological advances while integrating wide-scale DER and DR into the grid.

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Presented by:
Jason Iacobucci, President, PowerRunner, LLC
Keith P. Hock Director Transmission Technical Services and Operations Planning, Ameren Services

Thursday, June 7, 2018 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm ET

Leveraging recent investments in AMI, Ameren Illinois began aggregating hourly service point load forecast data by voltage (loss) class vs. the hourly system load to determine the loss factors per voltage class for every hour of the day. Not only does this innovative approach reduce the time it takes to perform a loss study from more than a year to seconds, but it more accurately accounts for real losses across the system. This innovative approach to system loss studies will be essential to utility planning efforts, particularly in the siting and integrating DER on the distribution grid.

Ameren has filed new tariffs for calculating distribution system losses by voltage class with the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC). This innovative approach will virtually eliminate the need to perform traditional loss studies, and the ICC Staff view the methodology as a more equitable approach to socializing the cost of technical losses and related distribution system unaccounted for energy (DUFE).

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Presented by: David A. Copp, Sandia National Laboratories

Thursday, April 12, 2018 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm ET

Power systems consist of many components distributed across wide geographic areas. A sudden increase or decrease in load or generation in these systems results in swings in power transfer between regions, called inter-area oscillations. Damping these inter-area oscillations is crucial for maintaining a secure and reliable power grid. In this webinar, we present distributed control schemes that can be used to improve the small-signal stability of large power systems. Implementations include the modulation of power transfer along a High Voltage DC transmission line, as well as injecting real power from distributed energy storage devices. This presentation will show results from several example power systems including the western North American Power System. Furthermore, it will discuss practical challenges arising from using remote measurements for feedback signals. Specifically, characterize the time delays associated with synchrophasor-based measurements and highlight the effect time delays have on stability of the distributed control system.

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Presented by: Manimaran Govindarasu, Professor, Iowa State University

Thursday, December 21, 2017 | 1:00 – 2:00pm ET

Modern electric power grid is a complex cyber-physical critical infrastructure that forms the lifeline of our society, its reliable, secure, and resilient operation is of paramount importance to national security and economic well-being. In recent years, there has been growing concerns over the cybersecurity of the power grid, due to both from increasing trend of cyber-attacks and the sophistication of these attacks. For instance, cyber attacks on Ukrainian power grid in 2015 and 2016, and also increasing number attempts to infiltrate into grid infrastructures of many nations underscore the urgency and importance of this issue. This talk first focuses on the technical challenges associated with protecting the grid, and then discusses R&D directions and best practices to achieve cybersecurity. In particular, a holistic cybersecurity framework — encompassing attack deterrence, prevention, detection, mitigation, resilience, and attribution/forensics — is discussed. The concepts of end-to-end-security, defense-in-depth, attack-resiliency, and cybersecurity testbeds are also briefly discussed.

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Presented by: Liang Downey, Business Development Executive for IBM’s New Energy and Environment Group

Thursday, October 5, 2017 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm ET

IoT creates huge amount of data and it can become a stress factor for organizations. A Cognitive New Energy System will consume less resources based on knowing the real-time energy demand, weather, consumption, thus it only generates the right amount of energy when and where it is needed. The system not only captures machine2machine and human2machine knowledge from the past by learning from each interaction but also be able to predict future behaviors.

To thrive amid the DER complexity and digital disruption, the new energy sector must overcome struggles unlocking the value of massive amount of IoT data that is largely underutilized to better manage system, offer new customer solutions that delights them, such as energy trading. Cognitive-based systems are unique in their ability to make sense of all kinds of data to build knowledge and provide confidence-weighted actions. This capability is critical to build the new energy future that is more distributed, flexible, efficient and sustainable.

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Presented by: Jennifer Reeves, Senior Product Manager
GE’s Grid Solutions

For utility distribution operations center (DOC) personnel, a new type of intelligence called “situational intelligence” (SI) is emerging. The industry’s definition continues to evolve, but in general terms, SI can be defined as getting the right information to the right person at the right time, to support situationally intelligent decisions and actions. Big data and analytics software cannot give “intelligence” to an individual DOC operator. Too much information without the supporting expertise and process knowledge could lead to less effective decisions in the height of a storm.

This webinar - presented by Jennifer Reeves of GE's Grid Solutions - explores the eco-system of human behaviors, traits and supporting technological advances in the software user experience (UX) that will help utility companies foster a heightened level of situational intelligence in their DOC, resulting in better quality decision making and action taking at the height of a crisis.

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Presented by: Josh Taylor, Assistant Professor - University of Toronto

Thursday, April 20, 2017 | 1:00 – 2:00pm ET

The intermittency of wind and solar power make it difficult to balance the supply of and demand for electric power. Energy storage and flexible load aggregations can solve this problem by storing power in times of surplus and releasing power during deficits. Presently, high costs and technical complexity hinder the use of storage and load flexibility in power systems.

In this webinar, we present the financial storage right, a new market mechanism that enables storage to participate in electricity markets in the same manner as transmission lines, and further enables risk-averse market participants to hedge against price volatility due to congestion.

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Presented by: Mladen Kezunovic, Regents Professor, Director Smart Grid Center - Texas A&M University

Thursday, April 13, 2017 | 1:00 – 2:00pm ET

The issue of Big Data (BD) was introduced relatively recently as the enormous amounts of data became available through the space exploration, weather forecasting and medical biogenetic investigations. Social media and outlets such as Google, YouTube, Facebook and others have also faced similar problems of handling huge data sets.

The focus of this webinar is on different BD sources in the utility industry that range from field measurements obtained by substation/feeder intelligent electronic devices, to specialized commercial and/or government/state databases: weather data of different types, lightning detection data, seismic data, fire detection data, electricity market data, vegetation and soil data, etc.

Due to the massive amount of such data (terabytes) available in real time, and through historical records, processing and management of such data requires revisiting data analytics used in the BD industries such as banking, insurance and health care. This webinar will point out the BD characteristics in the power industry where the temporal and spatial properties, as well as correlation to the power system and component models are necessary for an efficient data uses.

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